Archive for NEWS – Page 2

How to become a successful athlete

The off-season gives you the perfect chance to relflect on the previous season. Address things that went well but also those that didn’t go quite to plan. This is necessary to develop as an athlete – capitalise on strength and figuring out why less positive things happened and from there deduce ways to prevent them from happening again.

As the new season is now just around the corner, it’s the perfect time to start making plans and laying down the foundations whilst you can. By addressing these and testing them now in the off-season will allow you to create better habits early on in order to become a better athlete.

Below are a few tips to help you to become a more rounded and successful athlete in 2020.

Time management
We already know how time-consuming Triathlon is as it involves 3 different sports in one, so we are aware that it requires and awful lot of time and commitment in order to see results. Being time-efficient is key to becoming a successful athlete. Using the time you have available between work, and family life can be tricky but certainly do-able if you use that time effectively.

There are a number of hacks that you can try. Many with busy work schedules find themselves getting up extra early to cram a session in on the turbo before driving off to work…or they head out for a late-night run once the kids have gone to bed. But an event more time efficient, and super-effective training method is to incorporate training into your commute. If you have to travel a reasonable distance by car everyday, is there a way of switching the car for your bike and banking some solid miles on the bike to get you from point to point and back again?

Or if you are struggling to fit in some longer sessions at the weekends due to a busy social schedule, is there a way of travelling to trips via bike and meeting them there? This is a perfect way to bank that long ride and it doesn’t interfere with the rest of your weekend plans with the family.

Listen to your body not your ego
This is a real error that athletes struggle with (and more often than not try to ignore). One of the keys to being a successful athlete is learning to listen to your body and adjust your training accordingly. If you feel tired and fatigued but your coach or TrainingPeaks is telling you that you have a hard interval session planned for that day, it would be wise to raise how you are feeling with your coach and either alter the session to something easier, or take it off completely.

A reminder that rest plays a vital part in performance and a long successful career. Taking rest days does not make you weak!

Preparation
This falls similarity under the time-management bracket. Being prepared and organised will make anyone’s life a lot easier to manage, but this is crucial for any athlete. For example, making sure you know what your training sessions are for the day and what kit you need to take with you. Or knowing what splits you need to hit in your sessions beforehand and not working them out mid-session. Creating good habits and routines that work for you helps take away any unwanted pressures or stress to your already busy lives.

Mental focus
An athlete who is able to mentally prepare themselves and ‘zone out’ is an effective athlete! Having the ability to maintain focus through sessions when nobody is watching ensures you hit rep after rep. In the cold, wet, dark winter nights throughout off-season is where PBs are made. Focusing on goals, training the mind to endure and face all potential problems that may arise in competition and learning to deal with them is something all athletes should work on.

So when you are preparing for your 2020 season, be sure to look back over these tips beforehand and try to incorporate them into your daily routines. Create good habits now even if they don’t seem necessary just yet. You will be thankful for them on race day.

Melksham Motor Spares, back with DB Max at the Melksham Town FC 10K

Award winning local business, Melksham Motor Spares, are proud to be announced as the lead sponsor of Melksham Town FC 10K for the second year.

 

Melksham Motor Spares are the leading independent supplier of quality automotive parts and accessories in the region and celebrated their 50th anniversary in 2018. The company have also been awarded the prestigious industry accolade of ‘Distributor of the Year’ from the Independent Automotive Aftermarket Federation. 2019 also saw the launch of their brand new ‘MMS’ logo and strapline ‘More than just car parts’ to emphasise the extensive range of products and services the company can now offer.

Their trade counter and large retail shop on Bowerhill stocks an extensive range of trusted and recognised brands, boasting the largest stockholding in the region. This combined with a large fleet of modern delivery vehicles and a highly trained, experienced technical sales team, means you are assured of the best all round service for both trade and retail customers.

Phil Dodd, Melksham Motor Spares Managing Director, said, “As a local business, we love supporting the community however we can, so we’re delighted to be continuing our sponsorship of the Melksham Town FC 10K.”

Competitors taking part on race day, can receive a free goody bag from Melksham Motor Spares by visiting their stand on the day with their race number.

Will Whitmore, DB Max Managing Director, said, “After the successful launch of this event last year, DB Max are excited to be working with Melksham Motor Spares and the Melksham Town FC venue, once again in 2020. With DB Max being based in Melksham since 2012, this perfect partnership continues for a second year.”

 

Entries opened on Monday 24th February for the Melksham Town FC 10k in association with Melksham Motor Spares. Grab your race entry soon to avoid disappointment here.

For more information about Melksham Motor Spares visit www.melkshammotorspares.co.uk.

Race Letter – Chilly February 2020

It’s Chilly time folks! Sunday 16th February 2020 sees the ‘Chilly’ 10k and ‘Chilly’ Duathlon at the world famous Castle Combe Circuit.

Please click and read your 10k race letter HERE or your duathlon race letter HERE carefully prior to race day. The race line-up and live result pages are available now at Chilly Results.

Please check your details very carefully and email your Race Timer here, if there are any errors. Please note, this is very important as if you race with incorrect details (gender, category, club), you may be disqualified.

Things to remember for race day:

  • Please ensure that you know your race number when arriving at the registration desk.
  • Please enter car parks as directed from the road.
  • 10k start time is 10am, with duathlon waves at 11:45 and 12:40. Please note you may not change your wave.
  • Duathletes – Your signed waiver from your race letter and your photo ID. You cannot race without these.

That’s all for now. Good luck with your final race preparations and we look forward to seeing you on Sunday 16th February.

 

 

How to calm pre-race nerves

Nerves are a pretty common experience prior to a big race or competition. They’re not a bad thing as nerves get your adrenaline pumping and raring to go. However, they can sometimes get the better of you and your performance suffers as a result. If you’ve suffered from nerves and find they impact you negatively, we hope these tips will help you keep them under control and use them as a force for good.

#1 Relaxation techniques
Relaxation techniques are something to practice in the weeks leading up to the event. Used correctly, relaxation will help you feel more confident and less anxious because your shift your mindset from one of dread to one of excitement.

There’s a tonne of relaxation tips online, but they can include listening to calming music or a podcast, reading a book meditating or simply sitting peacefully not doing anything. They just need to help your mind switch off, clearing out any negative emotions or thoughts.

#2 Distraction
In the weeks leading up to a big race, sometimes all you can about is race day. No matter how hard you try to block it out, you can’t escape it and the nerves begin to tighten their grip.

In this instance, try to detach yourself from the event by doing other activities to distract your mind. For example, meeting up with friends, going for a coffee, keeping busy at work or planning a new project. Distracting the mind with other things will help you avoid unnecessary (and unhelpful) overthinking.

#3 Respect and acknowledge your thoughts
Having the ability to accept your feelings and emotions is key in dealing with – and overcoming – them. Being able to control these thoughts is a really important skill to have as an athlete.

#4 Visualisation
Our minds are incredibly powerful and if we train them well they can be a huge asset for optimal performance on race day. Visualising how you want a race to pan out and rehearsing every detail can really comfort the mind and increase confidence in your ability. Being able to visualise yourself achieving your goals and the race going perfectly can help remove anxious thoughts or elements of doubt and what could go wrong.

Now that you’re going to be cool as a cucumber on race day, check out our range of running and triathlon events and obstacle course races.

3 tips to race a faster triathlon

Whether you are a newbie to the triathlon scene and have just entered your first race, or you’re a seasoned pro heading back to a previous race to try and shave a few seconds off your PB, everyone is looking to get a little faster. Here’s 3 easy tips to shave seconds for no extra effort.

There will always be room for improvement when it comes to racing in triathlon, After all, you are dealing with three disciplines, not to mention the transitions and nutrition that also go into a successful race – there will always be areas you can refine and make better. Here are three common problems we see at our races that athletes lose valuable time on, so keep reading and let us help you.

Don’t lose sight in dark, murky waters

  1. Sighting. Let’s start with the first discipline and that’s swimming. The key issue we see in the swim is sighting. Most of us train in a pool, following a straight black line up and down. However, when it comes to race day, most swims are in open water and this can be troublesome for many. You are often (very) lucky if you can see your hand in front of your face, and the route often navigates a few turns, not to mention contending with weeds, moss and – God forbid – jellyfish! The key is practice – get a handful of open water sessions under your belt before the big day and practice sighting. Most venues have bouys set out in place for you to practice and this will allow you to replicate a similar style to race day.
  2. Transitions. Valuable seconds – minutes, even – can be lost of saved here. Unfortunately there is no pause button in a triathlon and transition times count towards your overall time so the faster yo can make your way through T1 and T2 the better. In order to do this you need to practice. Practice stripping off your wetsuit and getting into your bike kit. Ensure you know where everything is and where you have left your kit before you run out of T1. The same applies for T2 – practice dismounting and running into transition, taking your helmet off and donning your kicks. The more you prepare, the more seamless it becomes – by race day you’ll be on autopilot.
  3. Pacing and fuelling. The adrenaline, nerves and excitement of racing will certainly be high and it’s easy to get ahead of yourself and forget certain things as soon as the race begins. It’s easy to go off too hard and easy to forget to take on nutrition, but both will cost you dearly down the road. Mitigate against these avoidable mishaps by practicing pacing and fuelling on training rides and runs. Train at race intensity and see how easy (or not) it is to eat and drink what you plan to consume on race day.

These simple gains take seconds to practice but could shave minutes off your next triathlon.

Now that you have those nailed, check out the triathlons we’re organising this year!

How to improve mental toughness for racing

Most endurance-based sports such as triathlon require the individual to have a good level of mental toughness. Purely to even consider doing the sport would likely mean you have a level of mental resilience anyway. However, sometimes we can let our minds get the better of us and when certain circumstances occur mid-racesuch as bad weather or a puncture we can lose it and let our minds get the better of us.

This aim of this blog is to provide some methods to practice in training to enable you to develop mental toughness so that, come race day, nothing will stop you.

  1. Train in all conditions. It’s rare to have ‘perfect conditions’ on race day and the weather is entirely out of our control. We all frantically observe the weather forecast in the week leading up to the race, praying it stays dry and the wind is minimal. But in the UK in particular, this is wishful thinking! Therefore, we should practice training in all elements. If it’s raining and you are due to head out on a long ride, don’t opt for the turbo – get out there and embrace it. Same with running. If its ridiculously windy don’t opt for the treadmill, get out amongst it and get it done. You aren’t going to have the option of indoor training on race day and if you can tough it out in training you can certainly get through it in a race situation where adrenaline and nerves are high unlike other training sessions where motivation may not be quite as high.
  2. Train harder than your race. If you have endured tough training sessions and have pushed through longer rides and runs than the actual race distances, you will go into the race feeling a lot more confident in your ability. Like anything, the more you push your limits and learn to ‘suffer’ the easier race day will feel. Your body is a remarkable thing and it has the power to remember certain feelings and experineces. The more you put the body and mind through tough and difficult situations, the more prepared and ready you will feel for the race.
  3. Discomfort and uncertainty is a great thing. We are all stronger and more capable than what we think – racing exposes this. We always seem to find that extra 1% when we really need to. Things that are uncertain or that scare us are great and should be embraced. Nothing ever grows from a comfort zone. Going into the unknown on race day not knowing what the day will hold might be scary, but it’s great for building resilience and a strong mentality. There are high chances of things not going to plan during a race and it’s having the ability to keep calm and get through it.
  4. Believe in yourself. This is a great one to end with. You have to truly believe in yourself. If you don’t, nobody else will, and that doubt will show on race day. Give yourself a race day mantra and repeat it over and over when training. Engrain it in your mind and use it. Replicate the race you want and believe you’re capable of. Also, make sure you go through potential issues that could occur and visualise handling them on race day. Going into a race with all the scenarios covered will give you a high level of confidence.

Now that you’re armed to tackle any race day scenarios, take a look at our events and get your name down – you’re set to smash it!

Run your way to a PB in your next triathlon

Of all three disciplines, the run seems to be the determining factor / make or break in a triathlon. It’s what it all comes down to. If the legs aren’t there when you hop off the bike, it could be a very slow and slightly uncomfortable run to that finish line.

Here are a few tips to get you quicker and more efficient on that final part of your race.

1 Get used to running on tired legs

Practicing ‘Brick’ sessions (running straight after a bike ride) or running the following day after a long/hard bike session in your training sessions is a great way of getting the legs adjusted to this feeling. Sessions like these will help replicate the similar movement patterns used when you get into T2 and out on the run. It will help your body and mind remember this feeling and know exactly what to do and how to cope when you really need those legs to turn up and produce the goods.

2 Get Stronger in the swim and on the bike

If you notice a huge difference in your running when ‘fresh’ (i.e just running) to when you run in a triathlon off the back of the swim and bike sections, you may need to look at getting stronger in those two disciplines in order to help you support the run. By getting strong in the water and on the bike will help you sustain better endurance and become more aerobically efficient. Try to build up these two elements in your winter training and see how this effects the run for the better.

3 Up the run volume

Like with anything, the more you work on things, the better you will become. Look to increase the mileage gradually each week and up the volume to allow the body to adjust and get stronger as we head into the new year.

Happy Running!

How to choose the right triathlon

With the triathlon scene becoming more and more popular each year, there are now thousands of races to choose from. It can all become a little overwhelming (not to mention expensive!) when sitting down to pick which races you are going to enter.

We’ve jotted down these tips to help you figure out which ones might be right for you:

1 What are your goals?

Before picking any races, make sure you have all of the goals you are looking to achieve within the season beforehand. If you are looking to qualify for certain races such as AG European or World champs for example, you need to know which races you can enter which will enable you to try and qualify for them. If your goals are a little less serious and just want to enjoy races and see what happens then your decisions on what races to enter would likely be different. Be sure that whichever races you chose, they have relevance to you and your goals.

2 What is your level of commitment to triathlon?

Another point to consider is what level you feel you are at within triathlon. Are you a beginner looking for a few low-key friendly races to do as a bit of fun? Or are you season professional with aims of turning pro? Regardless of where you sit, be sure you can commit to what you have entered.

Will you have enough time to fit the training in and be ready for these races? Think about how much you can realistically do next year and then chose the races from there.

3 Time of year

Bear in mind what time of year the races are before you book them. If you intend of racing in hotter climates or in the peak of British summer (I know this doesn’t really matter as we don’t really have much of a summer!!), ensure you are able to prepare for them and know what it will be like to train in these kind of temperatures.

4 Race location

It goes without saying, but make sure you know where the races are locared when you sign up! I know a couple of people who have entered a race only to realise it was a complete pain in the neck to get to. So ask yourself: how easy is it to get there? Will you need to get there a few days off work? How early do you have to get there to rack / register? Weigh up all this information before you press enter.

5 Read race ratings and eedback

Do you know others that have done these races you are looking to do? If so, try to gain as much information about them as possible to gauge what their experience of it was and whether it sounds like a good one to do. There are also plenty of race review websites available on line that can also help with this. Feedback is always a great way to make the decision on whether to enter them or not.

We hope these tips help you in choosing your perfect races for 2020! Don’t forget to check out our range of DB Max triathlons – there’s bound to be one or two that fit your schedule!

Race Letter – Westonbirt House Christmas 10K 15th December 2019

It’s the Westonbirt House Christmas 10k on Sunday 15th December DB Maxers!

The race now in its fourth year is once again a sell out at the stunning Gloucestershire venue.

Please click and read your race letter HERE carefully prior to race day. Race bibs and timing chips have been posted out to you. If you have been a transfer due to the original postponement of the event you will collect your race bib from registration on the day of the race.

The race line-up and live result pages are available at Westonbirt House Christmas 10k Results.

Please check your details very carefully and email your Race Timer, if there are any errors – this is very important as if you race with incorrect details (gender, category, club), you will be disqualified.

Please note that there are no transfers and no day entries.

Things to remember for race day:

  • Don’t forget it is December and the weather could be somewhat unpredictable. Please dress appropriately for the weather conditions on the day.
  • You cannot run with someone else’s number. Anyone found doing so will be disqualified immediately, reported to the ARC and banned from any DB Max event for 12 months.
  • There are no day entries available.
  • There are no refunds, deferrals or transfers at this stage as per our T&C’s.

That’s all for now folks. Good luck with your final race preparations and we look forward to seeing you on Sunday 15th December. 

Race Letter – BUCS Chilly Duathlon Champs 2019

It’s almost time for the BUCS Chilly Duathlon Championships 2019!

Sunday 24th November 2019 sees the very best of the UK’s university students racing at the world famous Castle Combe Circuit.

Please click and read your race letter HERE carefully prior to race day. The race line-up and live result pages are available now HERE.

Please check your details very carefully and email your Race Timer here, if there are any errors with any of your team members. Please note, this is very important as if racing with incorrect details (gender, University, etc.), may incur penalties or disqualification.

That’s all for now. Good luck with your final race preparations and we look forward to seeing you on Sunday.