3 tips to race a faster triathlon

Whether you are a newbie to the triathlon scene and have just entered your first race, or you’re a seasoned pro heading back to a previous race to try and shave a few seconds off your PB, everyone is looking to get a little faster. Here’s 3 easy tips to shave seconds for no extra effort.

There will always be room for improvement when it comes to racing in triathlon, After all, you are dealing with three disciplines, not to mention the transitions and nutrition that also go into a successful race – there will always be areas you can refine and make better. Here are three common problems we see at our races that athletes lose valuable time on, so keep reading and let us help you.

Don’t lose sight in dark, murky waters

  1. Sighting. Let’s start with the first discipline and that’s swimming. The key issue we see in the swim is sighting. Most of us train in a pool, following a straight black line up and down. However, when it comes to race day, most swims are in open water and this can be troublesome for many. You are often (very) lucky if you can see your hand in front of your face, and the route often navigates a few turns, not to mention contending with weeds, moss and – God forbid – jellyfish! The key is practice – get a handful of open water sessions under your belt before the big day and practice sighting. Most venues have bouys set out in place for you to practice and this will allow you to replicate a similar style to race day.
  2. Transitions. Valuable seconds – minutes, even – can be lost of saved here. Unfortunately there is no pause button in a triathlon and transition times count towards your overall time so the faster yo can make your way through T1 and T2 the better. In order to do this you need to practice. Practice stripping off your wetsuit and getting into your bike kit. Ensure you know where everything is and where you have left your kit before you run out of T1. The same applies for T2 – practice dismounting and running into transition, taking your helmet off and donning your kicks. The more you prepare, the more seamless it becomes – by race day you’ll be on autopilot.
  3. Pacing and fuelling. The adrenaline, nerves and excitement of racing will certainly be high and it’s easy to get ahead of yourself and forget certain things as soon as the race begins. It’s easy to go off too hard and easy to forget to take on nutrition, but both will cost you dearly down the road. Mitigate against these avoidable mishaps by practicing pacing and fuelling on training rides and runs. Train at race intensity and see how easy (or not) it is to eat and drink what you plan to consume on race day.

These simple gains take seconds to practice but could shave minutes off your next triathlon.

Now that you have those nailed, check out the triathlons we’re organising this year!